Sunday, 2 Oct 2022

Ukraine LIVE: Putin’s ‘next target’ laid bare by despot’s ally after failing invasion

Ukraine: Vladimir Putin exposes own weakness with mistakes

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With Russia currently bogged down in Ukraine, former President Mr Medvedev hinted the country’s current leader was already plotting his next move. Medvedev’s tweet, posted on August 2 but since removed, claimed a region in northern Kazakhstan was “historically” part of Russia.

Such language is strikingly reminiscent of the justifications which Putin used prior to ordering his invasion of Ukraine on February 24.

Eurasia specialist Paul Globe, writing for The Jamestown Foundation research group, argued the message reflected the views of most within the Kremlin.

He said: “As a result, increasing numbers of Kremlin analysts have suggested that Kazakhstan is likely to become Russian President Vladimir Putin’s next target.

“That Moscow is angry and that Nur-Sultan [the capital of Kazakhstan] is worried are beyond doubt.

“A veritable war of words have occurred between the two sides, with Russian writers talking about Kazakhstan becoming ‘a second Ukraine, and Kazakhstani commentators countering that the two countries are in the midst of ‘a bad divorce’.”

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  • Putin ‘has identified next target’07:10
  • Putin ‘has identified next target’

    VLADIMIR Putin has already identified his next target for invasion, a since-deleted tweet by close ally Dmitry Medvedev has claimed.

    With Russia currently bogged down in Ukraine, former President Mr Medvedev hinted the country’s current leader was already plotting his next move.

    Medvedev’s tweet, posted on August 2 but since removed, claimed a region in northern Kazakhstan was “historically” part of Russia.

    Such language is strikingly reminiscent of the justifications which Putin used prior to ordering his invasion of Ukraine on February 24. Eurasia specialist Paul Globe, writing for The Jamestown Foundation research group, argued the message reflected the views of most within the Kremlin.

    Source: Read Full Article

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